IESD

Interactive Entertainment Sound Developers (IESD)

Interactive Entertainment Sound Developers (IESD) is a branch of the Game Audio Network Guild (G.A.N.G.) focused on discussing and addressing the needs, resources, standards, and continuing education of game industry sound implementation professionals.


IESD's Objectives

  • TANGIBLE REFERENCE MATERIALS

    Provide, commission, maintain and disseminate useful recommended best practices that apply to interactive audio development

  • OPEN DISCUSSION & NETWORKING
    Provide a technology, publisher and geography agnostic platform for discussions, lectures, white papers, demos and networking specifically targeted to the art and technology of sound design for interactive media
  • UNDERSTANDING OF THE MEDIUM
    To further and enhance the understanding of the technology, craft and artistry of interactive sound design both inside and outside the video games industry

IESD FAQ

What can I do?

As we prepare to launch the IESD this summer, we are looking to GANG members interested in joining the group to help us answer the important questions of what tasks the IESD should undertake to address.

What topics should the IESD be seeking to develop standards for across interactive entertainment experiences?

Current proposed topics include, but are not limited to, dialog levels, recording/mixing/listening levels, reference levels, tool file format standardization, and multi-channel mixing.

What kinds of events would be the most interesting and useful to you?

Initial ideas include advanced foley and SFX simulation, studio and field recording techniques, dialog implementation/management, multi-channel mixing, ‘post-mortems’ on game audio implementations

What kinds of information resources would be most useful for the IESD to assemble?

Topics include wikis comparing and contrasting game audio tools, recording best practices, overviews of non-NDA’ed platform audio specifications, techniques for common game-faced audio scenarios (radioization, asset management, cutscene vs. in-game mixing, etc.)

What are the best and most convenient ways to deliver these resources?

Live local/regional events, webcasts, podcasts, newsgroups, an e-zine, or whatever else is the easiest way to get information to sound designers in the most effective and timely manners.

We hope that you will consider joining us helping answer some of these questions. We look forward to your feedback, and hope you will be interested and able to help us launch this new group!